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When Microsoft released an out-of-cycle patch, one of the standout inclusions was the recent Pre-Beta release of their new operating system Windows 7. The highly anticipated OS, which also comes as a source of debate for Vista fans, is affected by the same remote code execution vulnerability that affects all the other production platforms.

Earlier this afternoon, Microsoft released MS08-067, which is an out-of-cycle security patch that should be added to this month’s security patch cycle for both IT departments and home users.

The patch centers on a vulnerability in the Server service, which is enabled by default on Windows 2000, Windows XP (all versions), and Windows Server 2003. The vulnerability is triggered if the system receives a malicious RPC request.

Source- The Tech Herald

Microsoft isn’t going to show Windows 7 to attendees of the Professional Developers Conference (PDC) in Los Angeles until Tuesday, October 28. But new info about what’s part of the pre-beta build that will be provided to show-goers is beginning to trickle out.

According to a variety of sources, the build that will be distributed at PDC — and, a week-plus later, at the company’s Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) — will be one of the M3 (Milestone 3) builds. Like the build that leaked in September, this will be a 6801 numbered build, sources say. But it doesn’t seem to be the same one I saw a few weeks back. UX Evangelist blogger Stephen Chapman says it will likely be a 6801 M3 build which Microsoft finalized on October 20.

So what’s in this soon-to-be-delivered Windows 7 pre-beta build? Here are a few new features Microsoft will provide, according to various individuals who’ve had a chance to see and hear about the forthcoming PDC pre-beta build. (Note: I didn’t bother running this list by Microsoft for official comment, as I figure the response will be: Wait till Tuesday.)

Source- all about Microsoft

windows-seven-thumb1 Microsoft has confirmed that Windows 7 is right on track for release in 2010. Concomitantly with the leaked details associated with Windows 7 Milestone 1 dropped by the Redmond company to select partners in January 2008, a potential timetable for the availability of the successor of Windows Vista was also made public. According to the leaked information on the next iteration of the Windows platform, having just reached M1, the final version of Windows 7 was to be wrapped up the end of 2009.
Officially, the Redmond company has only been saying that Windows 7 development would take an estimated three-year timeframe. However, Microsoft always failed to specify the moment when the three-year timeframe started. The debut of Windows 7 development was indeed connected with the release of Windows Vista, but this aspect only contributed to the confusion because the latest Windows client was launched to businesses in November 2006 and to the general public in January 2007. So in this context, the finalization of Windows 7 could just as easily be aimed for the end of 2009, as well as 2010.
Well, this is no longer the case. Microsoft explained that it would deliver Windows 7 three years after the consumers launch of Vista. "We are currently in the planning stages for Windows 7 and development is scoped to three years from Windows Vista Consumer GA. The specific release date will be determined once the company meets its quality bar for release," a Microsoft spokesperson revealed to Softpedia via email.
Windows Vista Consumer GA means nothing more than the general availability of the operating system. In this regard, Microsoft has merely reconfirmed what it has in fact said since mid 2007, that Windows 7 is planned for 2010. Recently, the Redmond company has delivered a build of Windows 7 for review to the U.S. antitrust regulators. This was made public via the "Joint status report on Microsoft’s compliance with the final judgments."
I contacted Microsoft and asked whether the new version of Windows 7 was still M1 or if the company has reached Milestone 2 (M2). The leaked timetable for Windows 7 had M1 set to expire in March, and M2 to be delivered in March/April. Outside of the confirmation quoted above, Microsoft did not comment on Windows 7 M1, M2 or the potential antitrust issues that would be generated by the connecting of Windows 7 with Windows Live Wave 3.
News Source: Softpedia

Microsoft has confirmed that Windows 7 is right on track for release in 2010. Concomitantly with the leaked details associated with Windows 7 Milestone 1 dropped by the Redmond company to select partners in January 2008, a potential timetable for the availability of the successor of Windows Vista was also made public. According to the leaked information on the next iteration of the Windows platform, having just reached M1, the final version of Windows 7 was to be wrapped up the end of 2009.
Officially, the Redmond company has only been saying that Windows 7 development would take an estimated three-year timeframe. However, Microsoft always failed to specify the moment when the three-year timeframe started. The debut of Windows 7 development was indeed connected with the release of Windows Vista, but this aspect only contributed to the confusion because the latest Windows client was launched to businesses in November 2006 and to the general public in January 2007. So in this context, the finalization of Windows 7 could just as easily be aimed for the end of 2009, as well as 2010.
Well, this is no longer the case. Microsoft explained that it would deliver Windows 7 three years after the consumers launch of Vista. "We are currently in the planning stages for Windows 7 and development is scoped to three years from Windows Vista Consumer GA. The specific release date will be determined once the company meets its quality bar for release," a Microsoft spokesperson revealed to Softpedia via email.
Windows Vista Consumer GA means nothing more than the general availability of the operating system. In this regard, Microsoft has merely reconfirmed what it has in fact said since mid 2007, that Windows 7 is planned for 2010. Recently, the Redmond company has delivered a build of Windows 7 for review to the U.S. antitrust regulators. This was made public via the "Joint status report on Microsoft’s compliance with the final judgments."
I contacted Microsoft and asked whether the new version of Windows 7 was still M1 or if the company has reached Milestone 2 (M2). The leaked timetable for Windows 7 had M1 set to expire in March, and M2 to be delivered in March/April. Outside of the confirmation quoted above, Microsoft did not comment on Windows 7 M1, M2 or the potential antitrust issues that would be generated by the connecting of Windows 7 with Windows Live Wave 3.
News Source: Softpedia

Microsoft has said precious little about Windows 7, but it has provided at least one outsider with an early test version of the forthcoming operating system. The software maker confirmed in a court filing last week that it has provided a test version of Windows 7 to the technical committee helping to oversee Microsoft’s compliance with the US antitrust settlement. Windows 7 crops up about a third of the way through the 21-page joint status report, initially with Microsoft noting that the technical committee would like to see an unspecified issue addressed in Windows 7.
"In addition, the [technical committee] has begun to review Windows 7 itself," Microsoft and regulators said in the filing. "Microsoft recently supplied the TC with a build of Windows 7, and is discussing TC testing going forward. The TC will conduct middleware-related tests on future builds of Windows 7."
Microsoft has not said when Windows 7 will arrive, nor said much about what features it will contain, though Bill Gates said in a recent interview with ZDNet.com.au sister site CNET News.com that Windows 7 is "a big step forward" in speech recognition and other natural interfaces. 

News source: ZDNet Australia

The court-mandated committee overseeing Microsoft’s compliance with a federal antitrust settlement has commenced reviews on the company’s next major operating system to ensure it meets the settlement’s terms.

The so-called Technical Committee recently received a build of Windows 7 from Microsoft and is checking it for any features that might violate the agreement. Presumably, most heavily under scrutiny is whether the OS causes host computers to favor Microsoft applications over third-party software — a practice the federal government cited in its original complaint against the company.

Microsoft to date has said little about Windows 7, which had been in development under the code name Blackcomb. It’s generally believed that the OS will ship in the 2010 timeframe.

Source-  Information Week

windows7 According to Activewin Windows 7 may not have all the features in it as it was previously reported.The site reads that that Microsoft would cut some of the features including DirectX 11 which was to be released along with windows7.Here is what activewin reads- 

There you have it.  Windows 7 may not save us after all.  It’s not that Vista is bad but it could be so much better.  Microsoft was hoping that was Vista SP1 would do only it didn’t.  The industry was hoping that Windows 7 would be the “anti-Vista” as it has been called by some but it doesn’t look like that’s going to happen either.

Allegedly the first feature to get cut from Windows 7 is DirectX 11.  While DirectX 11 may be optional at some point, it won’t be shipping with the operating system.  It turns out that manufactures which sell desktops and laptops with the awful awful horrible useless integrated graphics want no part of that particular requirement.

The Inquirer reports that half of PCs are sold with integrated graphics and one company sells nothing but which whined to Microsoft about it.  If DirectX 11 was a requirement for Windows 7, one quarter of PCs made wouldn’t be able to run it.

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